Minneapolis


Known as the City of Lakes, Minneapolis is the premier business and cultural center between Chicago and San Francisco. Many of its attractions are evident during even the briefest of visits—its striking downtown, beautiful neighborhoods, vibrant entertainment districts, nationally significant museums, orchestra, performance arts, and theater.

All are set within emerald embrace of the magnificent Grand Rounds park system, whose landscaped parkways encircle Minneapolis, interconnecting the city's sparkling lakes, Minnehaha Creek, and the Mississippi Riverfront. This rich array of parklands provides abundant year-around recreational opportunities: sailing, swimming, running, canoeing, biking, skating, cross-country skiing, and much more.

The University of Minnesota Minneapolis is a major research and teaching institution, offering a very broad range of prominent academic departments. The university's powerhouse engineering and medical faculties have formed the core of local technology startups over the past half century, from supercomputers to biomedical products. In fact, Minneapolis business activity has been based on often-daring entrepreneurship since the city's founding, which, along with a traditional emphasis on education, accounts for the region's exceptionally balanced and ever-adaptable economy.

Much of the city's attraction is not as apparent from a visit, especially the sense of belonging. Because Minneapolis business culture is open and entrepreneurial rather than rooted in an entrenched local social order, newcomers to the community are warmly welcomed, and encouraged to participate fully in the city's civic and social institutions. As a result, it is easy to feel a strong connection to the entire city, no matter which Minneapolis neighborhood one chooses to call home

1225 LaSalle,  1225 LaSalle Avenue, Minneapolis


As a reaction to the tremendous market sensation of 1200 on the Mall, 1225 LaSalle condominiums were constructed as the next segment in the subsequent year; each complex asserts the popular design of the prominent local architect James Stageberg. As opposed to the mid-rise construction of 1200 on the Mall, 1225 LaSalle looms as a high-rise structure with breathtaking views overlooking Downtown Minneapolis. Conveniently located in the midst of the Downtown bustle, LaSalle residents can easily travel on foot to a range of destinationswhether it is to work, the Walker Art Center, the Hennepin Theatre District, Orchestra Hall, or countless other exquisite local venues and restaurants.

American Trio Lofts,  250 Park Avenue, Minneapolis


As a reaction to the tremendous market sensation of 1200 on the Mall, 1225 LaSalle condominiums were constructed as the next segment in the subsequent year; each complex asserts the popular design of the prominent local architect James Stageberg. As opposed to the mid-rise construction of 1200 on the Mall, 1225 LaSalle looms as a high-rise structure with breathtaking views overlooking Downtown Minneapolis. Conveniently located in the midst of the Downtown bustle, LaSalle residents can easily travel on foot to a range of destinationswhether it is to work, the Walker Art Center, the Hennepin Theatre District, Orchestra Hall, or countless other exquisite local venues and restaurants.

Ivy Tower Hotel and Residence,  1115 Second Avenue South, Minneapolis


Ivy Tower is a quaint spire that was built in 1930. Although the building is charming in its quirkiness, due to its small floor plates the building was ineffectual as an office building and therefore hung in the shadow of demolition for dozens of years. Starwood Corporation entered this scene and acted as a saving grace for the structure by renovating and featuring it as a “signature expression” of a new multi-use development combining residences with a hotel. Living units range in size from 900 to more than 3100 square feet in floor area and offer all thinkable amenities. The complex offers skyway access to Downtown, a resort quality spa and wellness center, boutique retail, and a “destination restaurant.”

1200 on the Mall,   1200 Nicollet Mall, Minneapolis


In the mid-1970’s, 1200 on the Mall was an outrageously flourishing condominium centrally located in Minneapolis’ cherished Loring Park redevelopment. Today, the complex inhabits a hot spot where the freshly restored Loring Greenway meets the Nicollet Mall, directly across from the Hyatt Regency Hotel—literally in Downtown! The big-city feel of this condominium finds perfect balance in the abundance of vegetation, brilliantly landscaped, and pedestrian-only gateway to Loring Park designed by the nationally acclaimed landscape architect, M. Paul Friedberg. While the complex and its residential units have successfully preserved many of their earliest traits, communal spaces have been updated and the majority of units have been beautifully restored.

607 Washington Avenue South, Minneapolis


Renovated into lofts in 2003, 607 Washington sports the industrial flare of a building that is over a hundred years old. Baring raw timber construction and exposed brick walls, its interior features urban characteristics realistic to its original time period. Among Minneapolis residents, 607 Washington was elected as the top Loft/Condo conversion in 2005 by City Pages. With an array of unit sizes from 1,470 to 1,800 square feet, it isn’t hard for residents to find the right fit for any particular lifestyle. Modern updates such as geometrically-designed windows and open-air balconies allow for further appreciation of its historic and convenient location. Resurrected in the east warehouse district known for its roots in grain and flour trading, the lofts are only minutes away from the Mississippi Riverfront, the Guthrie Theatre, the light rail, and the Washington Avenue bus line servicing the University of Minnesota.

Centre Village,  433 South 7th Street, Minneapolis


When it was built in 1985, Center Village was thought to be an advanced urban-housing concept.  The building was conceptualized as part of a multi-use “omnibuilding” which combines a hotel and condominiums stacked on top of one of the city’s celebrated peripheral parking ramps.  It is located across from the manicured greenery of the Government Center and connects to Downtown via skyway.  Minutes after leaving their downtown jobs, residents can enjoy the rooftop pool-deck while admiring the near-by work of three international architects: Helmut Jahn’s 701 Fourth Avenue, Edward Charles Bassett’s Lutheran Brotherhood (now Thrivent) and Kohn Pedersen Fox’s Lincoln Center.

The Crossings, 121 Washington Avenue South, Minneapolis


Pioneering in-downtown housing by the same developer who built the pioneering 1200 on the Mall in the Loring Park housing district. Reflecting the city's goals at the time, The Crossings provides moderately priced downtown housing, connected to the skyway system. Units are ample in size and functional in plan, with balconies opening to the outdoors.

The Kenosha, 1204 Harmon Place, Minneapolis


Harmon Place has experienced several transformations over the past century. When The Kenosha was constructed as a residential hotel in 1907, Harmon Place was a haven from bustling Hennepin Avenue, a block away. In the 1920s, auto-related businesses like showrooms, repairs, and parts began to locate along the street, so by the 1950s, Harmon Place was the place to go when you wanted to buy a new car. After dealerships followed the expanding regional population out to the suburbs, the area lost its distinct identity, other than as the location of Billy Graham's international ministries. Perception changed once again in the 1970s, when Loring housing redevelopment and the expanding community college led to hundreds of millions of dollars in public and private investment. By today, Harmon Place has become a richly textured area, additionally associated with the University of St. Thomas and Walker Art Center, an array of distinctive restaurants, and of course the original, historic area feature, Loring Park.

Six Quebec, 601 Marquette Avenue, Minneapolis


A unique pied á terre set atop a commercial building in the heart of the city's financial district: this is the block where the Minneapolis skyway system was born, way back in 1962. At over 1,550 square feet of floor area, these are generously sized living units, certainly plausible as a primary residence. But a stressed-out executive with an office in a nearby tower might find this location ideal for a time-out from the daily grind. In addition to dozens of nearby restaurants open during business days, residents of these units can avail themselves to fine hotel dining seven days a week within this block, as well as at the new Westin Hotel kitty corner across 6th and Marquette, and at the IDS Center, at 7th and Marquette.

The Nicollet 1001 Nicollet Mall, Minneapolis


Throughout the twentieth century, Downtown Minneapolis was first and foremost a business center, its dominant architecture was office buildings. In this century, new downtown office development has fallen off precipitously, reflecting the decamping of corporate headquarters to elsewhere, the continued decentralizing of business activity, and increasing numbers of employees working at home. So it is a sign of the times to see this development, a 56-story residential tower, on what would previously have been understood as an office-building site. Moreover, the architecture is highly stylized, aggressively symbolizing the rising prominence of residential not just around Downtown, but right in its business core. The Nicollet is scheduled for a 2008 opening, offering living units ranging in floor area from 750 to more than 5,100 square feet. Positioned as an ultra-premium property, top-end amenities and finishes should be expected.

The Towers/River Towers Condominiums, 15 South 1st Street, Minneapolis


Back in 1959, the city embarked on a massive urban-renewal program to clear out the teeming "slum" district known as the Gateway. Hundreds of crumbling structures (and a few architectural landmarks) were razed, to be replaced by sparkling new buildings. The elimination of dozens of bars and flophouses cheered respectable citizens, but the consequent steep drop in human activity resulted in a sense of deadness within the district. This was to be cured by The Towers, upscale apartments intended to bring the right kind of human activity to the Gateway. Of course, the upper-middle-income Towers tenants were not the sort to stand around on area sidewalks all day, like the thousands of "bums" urban renewal had displaced. But this was the earliest downtown housing of the postwar era in Minneapolis, and due to quality construction has maintained its appeal more than four decades after opening. Especially the updated living units are well-scaled and eminently livable, enhanced by a large landscaped pool terrace and tennis courts.

Washburn Lofts, 700 South 2nd Street, Minneapolis


St. Anthony Falls is the reason Minneapolis exists where it does, pure and simple. Between the late 1800s and 1920, Minneapolis was the world's largest miller of grain and lumber. The West Bank of the riverfront, today's Mill District, was dominated by the Washburn Crosby Company—later known as General Mills. Washburn and Crosby are still familiar and respected names today, including hidden in the acronym for the company's radio and television stations: WCCO. So from a broad historical perspective, Washburn Lofts is not just an historic building, it is the historic Minneapolis building.

 
Lakes Area Realty
8567 S. 600 N.
Minneapolis, MN
612-280-1514

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